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Colloquia

Every week, senior researchers in each department at ASDRP give public seminars presenting the current state of the field and disseminating how their research at ASDRP fits into the broader context of the frontiers of modern science and engineering. Colloquia are public events, and anyone can join. Click on the "Join the Colloquia" link to add the event to your calendar.

Research Shorts

Department of Biological, Human and Life Sciences

Tuesdays @ 8:00-9:00 PM PST

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

No Biology Colloquium this week! See you next week!

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Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Physics

Fridays @ 8:00-9:00 PM PST

Friday, April 16, 2021

 

Inhibition of Amyloid Beta Aggregation via Natural Product Polyphenols

Neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, have long been the focal point of modern research. Till date, it has been proven that there is a direct correlation between β-amyloid protein aggregation and uncontrolled neural cell apoptosis, preludial to a majority of Alzheimer’s symptoms. A potential preventative and curative therapy to Alzheimer’s and related neurodegenerative diseases could be based on the inhibition of said β-amyloid and related prion protein aggregation. My group's research is meant to yield the most effective natural product polyphenols in said inhibition. Our in silico research assessed a large range of natural product polyphenol candidates and their potential to interact favorably with targeted proteins through docking softwares. Our in vitro and in vivo work continued testing on select polyphenols with the highest binding affinities.

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Researcher: Kavya P., Monta Vista High  School

Advisor: Renganathan, Medicinal Biochemistry

Keywords: polyphenols I amyloid beta I biology I chemistry I Alzheimer’s Disease I C. Elegans I assays

Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Physics

Fridays @ 8:00-9:00 PM PST

Friday, April 16, 2021

 

Synthesis of natural cyclic polypeptides and antibody-drug conjugates as potential anticancer agents

Multi-step synthesis has been an integral part of organic chemistry for years, necessary in producing many modern therapeutic drugs available today. Here, we go over the synthetic route of complex molecules which can potentially be applied in future anticancer therapeutics. Sansalvamide A and Psychrophilin F are cyclic polypeptides which are reported to have anticancer properties. However, these compounds are only available in limited quantities and cannot be produced on an industrial scale by isolating them from nature. A synthetic route for these molecules from amino acids allows for the large scale production of these molecules, allowing for further research on their therapeutic potential as anticancer agents and their mechanism for the inhibition of cancer cell growth. Although total synthesis allows for anticancer molecules to be produced in large scale, they still have another big issue-- selectivity. The synthesis of antibody drug conjugates allows for the combination of antibodies and an extremely cytotoxic drug that can solve the issue of selectivity. The antibody acts as a delivery vehicle for the drug, such that the drug is guaranteed to reach the cancer tissue. It can then be photochemically released onto the specific site. The synthesis of natural cyclic polypeptides and antibody-drug conjugates opens a possibility for new anticancer agents.

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Researcher: Kuvam B., Washington High School

Advisor: Njoo, Organic, Medicinal Chemistry

Keywords: Organic synthesis | Medicinal Chemistry | Cyclic Peptides | Antibody-Drug Conjugates | Cancer

Department of Computer Science and Engineering

Wednesdays @ 8:00-9:00 PM PST

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

 

NO colloquium this week! Enjoy your spring break!

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